Tuesday, December 2, 2008

Keil and Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

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This is a huge commentary. On paper it is ten volumes, 7744 pages, about 20 pounds and would take up about a foot-and-a-half of bookshelf space. Since I have it on my PDA I can take it with me all the time. Thanks to Olive Tree for that.

Originally published in 1866, it has been revised since then. The authors rejected the liberal error that was creeping in the German church of their time and maintained that the Old and New Testaments are the revealed word of God. This is a classic conservative commentary.

Each book of the Old Testament has an introduction and then an in-depth technical, historical and literary analysis of the text. Even with its depth, the everyday reader can understand what is said. In order to understand the New Testament, an understanding of the Old is essential.

I was thinking about Genesis 1:5, And there was evening and there was morning, the first day. I looked it up in Keil and Delitzsch. In the beginning of the comments, it establishes from the grammar that this refers to a normal day. It then goes on for pages giving all the background on why it is a normal day. “But if the days of creation are regulated by the recurring interchange of light and darkness, they must be regarded not as periods of time of incalculable duration, of years or thousands of years, but as simple earthly days.”

Having this resource on my PDA makes using it so much easier. I don’t have to grab various volumes off the bookcase when I want to look up something. It also makes it portable. I can use it while sitting in the park or while at church. I like to be able to wander through various resources during a Bible study or even while listening to a sermon. It’s so quick to look something up that I don’t miss a word that is said.

This is a great resource for a comprehensive understanding of the Old Testament. It’s easy to use whether you want a quick comment or detailed understanding of a word or passage.

Philip

Keil and Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

Olive Tree

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